Dad Goes To Day Care

By |2018-07-31T22:52:10+00:00December 10th, 2015|Insurance|

Alzheimer's Disease.There comes a time in the natural evolution of life that it makes sense to look for outside help when caring for your parents. Dad was still very vital and mostly self-sufficient but he was bored and needed more to keep himself occupied. The idea of finding an adult day care for him finally was addressed. He needed more interaction and more stimuli, plus we needed a short daily break.

We embarked on the adventure of finding a satisfactory place for Dad to visit a couple times a week. The first thing we learned was that there were two differences in adult day care centers. One choice would be for health care needs and the other was for social interaction. Fortunately for Dad, it was the social choice we were looking for.

We had been advised that there is a great deal of differences in adult day care, not just the health and special issues. One big issue was physical access, Dad used a walker and occasionally it was easier for him to get around in a wheel chair. Not all adult day care centers will take people in wheelchairs.

We asked about an activities schedule, do they offer physical activities? What mental stimulation is offered? Does a day care employee become involved or is that left to those who have come to use the day care? Do they encourage children to visit? Having a grandchild drop by and visit can raise the spirits of everyone. Activities are key, ask!

A well-run adult day care center’s goals will offer activities that enrich the experience. Here are some of the activities that may be available:

  • Arts and crafts therapy
  • Musical entertainment and sing-a-longs
  • Mental stimulation games such as bingo and card games
  • Stretching or other gentle exercise
  • Discussion groups led by a staff member
  • Holiday and birthday celebrations
  • Visits by religious organizations

Does the day care offer meals? If only snacks and drinks are offered, what is the menu? Many people have allergies or on a special or restricted diet, you have to ask. One key point we learned is water, seniors need water and does the day care center push drinking water? It seems like a simple question but the answer is very important.

One big surprise we found on our first day care visit was how dirt the bathrooms were. It is important to ask to see and inspect the bathrooms. Is the towel dispenser full, is there hand soap. Are there hand rails to help the user?

Make sure you know what the hours of operation are. What happens if someone is late in picking up Dad? Are they open on weekends? Is there a shift change during the day, will it affect Dad’s visit?

Ask about costs and expenses. How much is the daily rate? Is there an hourly rate? According to A Place for Mom ( www.aplaceformom.com) Average daily fees range from $50 to $70. Is there a minimum weekly rate to hold Dad’s spot if her were not there regularly? Some nonprofit adult day care centers offer scholarships, ask!

We found it a concern when we visited the day care centers the ratio of staff to users. We always asked what their staff ratio was and the better centers offered the better ratios. We found in nonprofit day care centers there was a better ratio of staff to user.

It may seem an absurd question but: are they licensed? Ask them and then ask to see their licenses. Any credible center will happily show you their license, don’t just assume it.

For Dad, it has been a wonderful experience. He looks forward to going to the center, we originally scheduled 2 days a week and now he is using the facilities almost every day. He has met a nice group of friends and has learned new activities he never dreamed would interest him.

I hope our research will help you in your search for an adult day care center.

I found additional help here:

www.ourparents.com

http://www.helpguide.org/

www.eldercare.gov

www.seniorresource.com

 

 

About the Author:

Bill Broich
Bill Broich is a well-known annuity expert with over 30 years of experience. He has written hundreds of articles on annuities and other financial topics, and has been a featured commentator on TV, Radio and the Internet. To follow Bill's profile, click here.